16 December 2008

I am finally working on the material from that survey

Back in the summer of 2004 we did a week-long land snail survey of a national park in western Turkey. We followed an intense schedule, which we referred to as the snail bootcamp: we would get up early in the morning, eat breakfast, drive to the park, collect until sunset, drive back home, eat dinner, work on the day’s collections, go to bed. The next day it would be the same schedule over again. I don't know about the other guys, but I was having fun. We did take 2 breaks lasting 3 days, but only to collect elsewhere.

One of those side trips resulted in the discovery of a new clausiliid species, Idyla aydinensis, that was the subject of this post. A survey we did in Istanbul that summer that also resulted in a publication and was the subject of this post. But the results of the survey of the national park, the main activity of that season, still haven’t seen the day light. And the reason for that is that yours truly, who has about 90% of the specimens in his possession, has been dragging his feet.

My tasks are easier said than done: sort thru the bags and bags of shells, check the identifications we did in Turkey, identify what hasn’t been identified, take measurements and photographs when necessary, get the lots ready for deposition into museums, prepare a species list and write the manuscript. But the wholly justified complaints and reminders of my co-workers finally reached a point where I decided I couldn’t procrastinate anymore. I actually enjoy doing every one of my tasks, it’s just that...

So, a couple of weeks ago I set up in the basement a table dedicated to the specimens of the said survey.

DilekTable

There are still many bags that we didn’t have time to sort thru during our evening sessions while in Turkey. I really get a kick out of pouring the contents of such a bag into a tray and casting my eyes on them for the first time. Ooh, I wonder what’s in this one? It’s like opening a present.

These were from our station D24.

D24

You can see 2 clausiliids, Albinaria puella and Bulgarica denticulata, Cantareus aspersus, Metafruticicola redtenbacheri and the flat Lindholmiola lens. The plastic tube is holding the micro shells.

Two of the most interesting specimens from this station were not even complete shells.

AspersusD24

These two Cantareus aspersus shells were predated by an unknown predator that peeled the shells spirally to get to the snails. I suspect some rodent was the culprit. The larger shell on the right was probably an adult.

More to come about the interesting stuff from this survey as I make progress.

2 comments:

Frank Anderson said...

These two Canterus aspersus shells were predated by an unknown predator that peeled the shells spirally to get to the snails. I suspect some rodent was the culprit. The larger shell on the right was probably an adult.

So the predator was older than the snails it ate? How do you know that?

(sorry...I couldn't resist)

AYDIN ÖRSTAN said...

The Oxford English Dictionary told me!